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Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

banner picture of people whom were important to black history with Dr. M.L. King in the middle


MLK Jr. Short Biography

In 1980, a graduate student led a successful campaign to begin celebrating the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. at MSU.

In 1986 Martin Luther King Jr. Day was established as a U.S. federal holiday and in 1998, Michigan State University's administration officially canceled the regular class schedule on the national holiday.

Since that time, each year on the third Monday in January, faculty, students, staff and surrounding communities join in the celebration of Dr. King to reflect on his message of civil rights and social justice for all through nonviolent means.


2016 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Commemorative Celebration


"If not now, then when? If not us, then who?"

The broader MSU community is invited to join in the commemoration of the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.  in January 2016. The theme this year is, "If not now, then when? If not us, then who?"  This theme is relevant in view of the social justice issues and acts of violence that our communities are facing today.  MSU colleges, academic units and administrative units will be sponsoring a variety of activities for students, faculty, staff and community members to attend and participate in.  The commemorative celebration of Dr. King, Jr. continues to embody the mission of Project 60/50 which promotes community-wide conversations about civil and human rights. Again this year, Michigan State University is collaborating with the Greater Lansing Area Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Commission, which hosts a special luncheon. Please visit the Commission's website for more information as it develops.

The 2016 Dr. King Planning Committee is excited about the programs that will be lined up this year.  They will include an innovative type of Student Leadership Conference, jazz concerts, a service learning project for students, a commemorative march, film and discussion, a special tour of a human rights exhibit, and a community dinner with a special focus.  More details will be available in the weeks ahead.  Be on the lookout for new information by visiting this website frequently.

If you have questions about this program, please contact the Office for Inclusion at 517-353-4563, Monday through Friday between 8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m.

Project 60/50 is a pioneer initiative whose best feature is its ability to bring a diverse community of individuals together to engage in conversations covering broad topics about civil and human rights.  Created to mark the anniversaries of Brown v. Board of Education and the 1964 Civil Rights Act, people from different cultural backgrounds are demonstrating that they want to be included and want to add their voices to a variety of conversations about human rights topics that are important to them. Project 60/50 is inclusive of everyone, regardless of how you identify.  Boundaries and barriers that divide us can be overcome as we gradually build trust and respect among us.  It's not about always agreeing, but always being willing to talk and learn from each other.